ATC Blog

Most Common Types of Car Accidents You’ll See as an Auto Appraiser

Assessing damage from car accidents on a daily basis, an auto appraiser who’s new to the field will quickly see that some types of crashes and collisions happen more than others. They often involve damage done to similar areas of the vehicle and at similar speeds.

Interested in what types of car accidents appraisers deal with the most? Check out ATC’s post below!

Low-Speed Contact

carcollisionA good portion of the damage that auto appraisers review is the result of a low-speed contact accident that occurred under 10 mph. Typically taking place in a parking lot where one of the cars is stationary, these accidents produce little damage and usually come down to scratches or dents with low repair costs attached.

Rear-End Collisions

Collision estimators will also see plenty of rear-end collisions. This type of accident often takes place when a car is tailgating another vehicle and doesn’t react quickly enough to brake when they do.

Rear-end collisions also occur when two cars are in line to yield into traffic. The accident occurs when the car behind the lead car incorrectly anticipates that the vehicle ahead has gone and hits the gas.

Single-Vehicle Crashes

Interestingly enough, most high-speed impact collisions seen by auto body appraisers are the result of one car and not necessarily two. From taking a turn too fast and colliding with a guard rail to hydroplaning on the highway and running off the road, often the higher the speed, the more serious the damage.

Depending on the situation and the speed, this type of car accident can result in a disastrous outcome amounting to a car that looks more like a crumpled up piece of metal than a functional vehicle. When cars that have endured single-vehicle crashes are damaged beyond repair, buying a new vehicle is often the better, more cost-effective option.

Side-Impact Collisions

As an auto body appraiser, you’re also bound to see your fair share of side collisions, or T-bone accidents, that involve the front of one car impacting the side of another.

These collisions tend to take place at four-way intersections where traffic crosses from both sides. T-bone crashes can be very dangerous and can lead to big medical conditions and amount to costly damage depending on where both vehicles hit and the speeds at which they did.

Interested in Learning More About Collision Reconditioning?

If you’re interested in how cars are built, from their underlying structural components to their smooth, paint-matched surfaces, a future in collision repair may be right for you.

To get a glimpse into a day in the life of a collision repair technician and find out where the collision industry is headed check out our free eBook Panels, Paints, and Graphics: The Future of Collision Repair.

 

For program disclosure information, please go to www.autotraining.edu/consumer-information.

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