ATC Blog

How More Careers in STEM is Creating Job Opportunities for Technical Workers

A study by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) occupations will grow at an annual rate of 13 percent through 2022 (as compared to the 10% yearly average for all occupations).*

What does more STEM careers mean for those planning their futures—specifically prospective technical workers, like automotive technicians? Automotive Training Center (ATC) decided to take a closer look! Learn more with the following post.

What is STEM and Why is it Important?

STEM jobs, which account for careers in the science, technology, engineering, and math sectors, have long been the positions that drive our nation forward.

Examples of STEM careers include aerospace engineers, software developers, and forensic scientists. In medical laboratories and technology test sites, and at drawing boards across the country, STEM workers come up with those new ideas, processes, and cures that best use our resources and technology to propel the economy forward.

More STEM Jobs Means…

With advancements being made at a faster rate and a heavier emphasis on technology, increased demand in STEM jobs creates a subsequent demand for individuals with strong STEM skills across industries. The product of STEM ideation and innovation has the power to change the way we go about our daily lives, from how we communicate to how we get from point A to point B.

One area we’ve seen be directly impacted by an upsurge in STEM innovation is the automotive industry. For example, In the past 10 years we’ve seen vehicle safety improve by leaps and bounds and drastic headway made toward implementing self-driving technology in cars.

What this Means for Prospective Automotive Technicians

Those interested in working on the frontlines of STEM innovation have plenty of career options to pursue in the automotive realm. Engineering and technology advancements have brought a major shift to what defines being an automotive technician. These developments are the reason why today technicians are known as technicians, and not mechanics.

By combining mechanical know how with the knowledge of technology and computer systems, automotive technicians in the diesel, collision, hi-performance, or marine fields can enjoy a challenging, fast-paced career that involves (both!) thinking on their feet and working with their hands.

Wonder what it’s like to attend an automotive training school, like ATC? Check out our day in the life video to hear from real ATC students attending our Exton or Warminster campuses!

Find the Automotive Field that Interests You Most

If working with the systems and equipment that are on the cutting edge of the industry excites you, pursuing a career as an automotive technician could be a great way to put your passion for vehicles and technology to work.

Which field in automotive is the right fit for you? Check out ATC’s free Automotive Technology Career Guide to learn about the various positions out there in today’s automotive, diesel, hi-performance, collision, and marine industries.

 

*Source: https://www.bls.gov/careeroutlook/2014/spring/art01.pdf

For program disclosure information, please go to www.autotraining.edu/consumer-information.

This site is protected by Comment SPAM Wiper.