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How to Become a Diesel Mechanic

Diesel fuels everything from the U.S. Postal Service’s mail trucks to commercial generators that provide crucial power to hospitals and housing complexes during an outage. This type of engine’s enhanced efficiency and overall durability are universal advantages for large-scale equipment and even smaller passenger vehicles.

Becoming a diesel mechanic means working with these fascinating systems and contributing to up-and-coming applications for an important global fuel source. Diesel is the future! If you’re interested in breaking out into this lucrative field, here’s how to become a diesel mechanic:

Know that Diesel is For You

A passion for diesel, as with any career field you choose to pursue, is important. Aspiring diesel mechanics tend to have a love for big engines and working with their hands.

Important skills that those working in the diesel realm must employ every day include: Active problem solving and troubleshooting, a high attention to detail, and a deep knowledge of diesel engine components, equipment, and maintenance procedures.

Get Your High School Diploma or GED

Becoming a Diesel Mechanic

So you want to become a diesel mechanic, what’s the first step and what level of schooling do you need? To start working toward a career as a diesel mechanic, you’ll first want to focus on getting your high school diploma or GED, a crucial education that will lay a strong foundation for your future.

Enroll in Post-Secondary Diesel Mechanic Training

No college or university experience is required to work in the automotive diesel field. What is required is completion of a post-secondary program at a technical career training school.

This in-depth two-year study can equip you with the textbook knowledge surrounding the diesel realm and hours of hands-on training, spent working on real diesel engines. To make sure you get the most out of your training, seek out a training provider with: …

  • Instructors who are certified by the National Institute for Automotive Excellence (ASE)
  • A curriculum based on the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF)’s recommendations.

Decide Your Preferred Path in Diesel

Deciding Your Diesel Career PathStudying to become a diesel mechanic doesn’t mean you’re tied down to that position and that position only. There are big opportunities out there for individuals with a comprehensive understanding of diesel engines and their applications.

In addition to working as an automotive, truck, bus, or marine diesel mechanic, you could specialize in several other equipment types such as injection pumps, power generators, agricultural equipment, and more.

You don’t need to know what your path will be now, but it’s something you can look forward to deciding at the completion of your post-secondary training.

Discover Diesel Technician Training at ATC

Think diesel is your path in automotive? We’d love to have you come out to Automotive Training Center’s Exton or Warminster campus. Choose the campus closest to you and we’ll introduce you to our diesel students at work, modern shop facilities, and diesel program instructors.

Learn more about our Automotive and Diesel Technology program or schedule a campus tour today!

For program disclosure information, please go to www.autotraining.edu/consumer-information.

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